Come to The Wrecking Ball- Sept. 21, 2013

If you got time for one more dance…. meet me at the Wrecking Ball!!

An Event to Preserve Chalmers Institute, Mississippi’s Oldest Chartered University

September 21st, 2013    6 pm – 10 pm

The grounds of Chalmers will come alive with a host of artists, authors, musicians and historians who have donated their appearances for the evening. The Ball will not only highlight regional cultural treasures, but also provide dinner and beverages and a silent auction featuring regional art!


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APPEARANCES BY

shannonShannon McNally

Shannon McNally got her first guitar and JJ Cale album at the age of 12 and never looked back. Combined with the classic rock she grew up listening to – The Allman Brothers, Dr. John and Hendrix – it’s the musical center of gravity she brought to her 2002 Capitol Records debut Jukebox Sparrow gaining notice from Rolling Stone, The New York Times, Leno and Letterman. This decidedly rare approach for a woman drew the same accolades for indie-based Geronimo, helmed by Charlie Sexton. Now, Shannon, along with New Orleans musical legend Mac “Dr. John” Rebennack have made a new LP to try and shine a spotlight on the work of Bobby Charles. Charles wrote such instantly recognizable hits as “See You Later Alligator,” “Walking to New Orleans” and “But I Do,” but the reclusive singer/songwriter, who passed away in 2010, is relatively unknown for his own recordings. Small Town Talk is an album of songs by the great but under-appreciated American songwriter, which features guest performances by Derek Trucks, Will Sexton, Luther Dickinson, and Vince Gill.

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Kenny Brown
Kenny Brown is an American blues slide guitarist, skilled in the North Mississippi Hill Country blues style popularized by his mentor R. L. Burnside. Brown began his career by apprenticing with Mississippi Joe Callicott, Johnny Woods, and Mississippi Fred McDowell. He has cites Muddy Waters, George “Mojo” Buford, Jessie Mae Hemphill, Junior Kimbrough, Johnny Winter, and Johnny Shines as influencesIn 1971, Brown began performing with R. L. Burnside, who claimed Brown as his “adopted son.” and affectionately called him “white boy on guitar” and “my white son.” Both Brown and Burnside have noted the singularity of Brown’s being a white musician playing in the previously predominantly African American genre of North Mississippi Hill Country blues. Brown’s guitar work was featured in the 2006 film Black Snake Moan, where he provided backing for star Samuel L. Jackson’s vocals. He can also be seen in the film’s climax as a guitarist in a blues band, playing alongside Burnside’s grandson Cedric. He has also performed with rock bands Widespread Panic and the Jon Spencer Blues Explosion.

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Willy Bearden
Willy Bearden is from Rolling Fork, Mississippi, in the Deep Delta. He is a writer and filmmaker who has written a couple of books including “Cotton, From Southern Fields to the Memphis Market,” “Memphis Blues, Birthplace of a Music Tradition,” and “Overton Park.” Bearden as also written and produced documentaries for public television, done films for the Elvis Presley Birthplace Museum, the Cotton Museum, The Memphis Wonders Series, and the Tunica River Park as well as writing a producing his first feature film “One Came Home” which was released in the summer of 2012. He is a founding member of the Delta Symposium at the University of Memphis and plays in two bands, the Earnestine & Hazel’s Band and the Grayhounds.

Click here to purchase tickets!

About

Preserve Marshall County & Holly Springs, Inc. (501c3) formed in 2005 with the hope of bringing historic preservation advocacy and educational outreach to the community. As one of our inaugural undertakings we acquired Chalmers Institute and are currently working to not only pay off the bank note on the property but to stabilize and eventually rehabilitate Chalmers Institute into regional resource once more. Constructed in 1837, Chalmers Institute, was Mississippi’s first legislatively recognized University. Within these walls countless leaders, writers, educators, and citizens received the educational foundations that would help to shape their lives, careers, and region’s history. Its enrollment actively continued until 1879 when it became another casualty of the Yellow Fever Epidemic of 1878. This proud structure entered its second life as residence until the 1980s. It now awaits its third life as a contributing member of the community with your help.

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